Our rationale:

Much of what happens in the youth field is accounted for by anecdotal evidence – annual reports of non-governmental organisations, ministries and international organisations paint a colourful picture of successful projects and initiatives. Critique is refuted with selected stories of success that say nothing about the overall achievements—and failures—of policies and programmes. Evaluation happens, but is hardly ever fully independent and generally serves to lend credibility to the contracting organisation or institution. We believe in the benefit of autonomous, impartial and non-partisan evaluation: critical if needed, laudatory if deserved – and that is how we conduct them.

Two examples:

(1) We conducted an external evaluation of the Balkan Incentive Fund for Culture. The Balkan Incentive Fund for Culture (BIFC), co-funded by the European Cultural Foundation and the Open Society Foundation, awards grants to cultural initiatives conceived by organisations in, or cooperating with, the countries of the Western Balkans.

(2) We conducted an external evaluation of the Advanced Compass Training in Human Rights Education. The long-term training had been instigated with the aim to further the quality of training in human rights education with young people and to consolidate and multiply the achievements of the Human Rights Education Youth Programme.

Further reading:
  • Balkan Incentive Fund for Culture. » 2009, pdf, 5 MB
    External evaluation for the European Cultural Foundation.
  • Advanced Compass Training in Human Rights Education. » 2009, pdf, 27 MB
    External evaluation for the Council of Europe.
  • Pilot Projects on Human Rights Education. » 2006, pdf, 1 MB
    External evaluation for the European Youth Foundation.
  • Better citizens? Better youth workers?. » 2003, pdf, 1 MB
    Impact survey for the Youth Partnership.

Featured image by Lili May at youthmedia.eu.